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  • Tags: Animation

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Title

College Crest Animation

Description

This animation describes the different elements that make up the crest of the College.

Transcript

"The current coat of arms was approved by College council in 1862. In the top left and bottom right quarters we can see the symbols for the physicians and surgeons,  the poppy and the lancet, with the staff of Asclepius, a Greek god of healing and medicine, in the centre. 

In the top right quarter we have the royal arms of Scotland, included to show the connections to the royal foundation of the College by King James VI.  

In the bottom left quarter is the shield of arms of the city of Glasgow,  included to show the importance of the local position of the College in the community. Above the central shield of the crest is a lamp in front of an open book, representing enlightenment and continued learning.

There are two goddesses on the crest, chosen to represent the scientific and medical and surgical characteristics of the College. On the right is Hygeia, the Greek goddess of health. And on the left, Minerva, the Roman goddess of science and art. 

Then we have the College motto. At the top, "Conjurat Amice", which translates to "together in friendship". This represents the physicians and surgeons working together.  At the bottom, "Non vivere sed valere vita",  which loosely translates to "not just to live life but to have a healthy life".

 

Description

This animation describes the different elements that make up the crest of the College. Transcript "The current coat of arms wasapproved by College council in 1862.In the top left and bottom right quarters we cansee the symbols for the physicians and surgeons,the poppy and the lancet, with the staff ofAsclepius, a Greek god of healing and medicine, in the centre.In the top right quarter wehave the royal arms of Scotland,included to show the connections to the royalfoundation of the College by King James VI. In the bottom left quarter is the shield of arms of the city of Glasgow,included to show the importance of the localposition of the College in the community.Above the central shield of the crest is a lamp infront of an open book, representing enlightenmentand continued learning.There are two goddesseson the crest, chosen to represent the scientificand medical and surgical characteristicsof the College. On the right is Hygeia,the Greek goddess of health. And on the left,Minerva, the Roman goddess of science and art. Then we have the College motto. At the top,"Conjurat Amice", which translates to "togetherin friendship". This represents thephysicians and surgeons working together.At the bottom, "Non vivere sed valere vita",which loosely translates to "not just tolive life but to have a healthy life".

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Title

Amputation Set Video

Description

This video gives insight into the instruments of an amputation set.

Description


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Title

College Founders Animation

Description

Have you ever wondered how and why our College was established? In this short video, we describe what led Peter Lowe to found our multi-disciplinary College in Glasgow in 1599, and how he did it.

Description

Have you ever wondered how and why our College was established? In this short video, we describe what led Peter Lowe to found our multi-disciplinary College in Glasgow in 1599, and how he did it.

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Title

Trephination Animation

Description

Watch this animation to learn about the unique history of the surgical procedure, trephination.

Description

Watch this animation to learn about the unique history of the surgical procedure, trephination.

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Title

Andreas Vesalius Animation

Description

Animation describing the ground-breaking work of Andreas Vesalius, "De Humani Corporis Fabrica."

Description

Animation describing the ground-breaking work of Andreas Vesalius, "De Humani Corporis Fabrica."

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Title

The Case of James Greenlees

Description

In 1867, Joseph Lister published a series of articles in The Lancet that were to be the first examples of antisepsis in action. Each of the cases occurred during his time working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. His first case was a young boy by the name of James Greenlees, who had an open fracture of his leg. Lister set the fracture and dressed the wound in carbolic acid to prevent infection. James made a full recovery. This was the birth of antisepsis.

Description


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Title

Introduction to Phrenology

Description

As part of our 2019-2020 exhibition, "Great Minds: The Brain in Medicine, Surgery and Psychiatry", we delve into the world of phrenology. Phrenology was very popular in Scotland during the early 19th century, but eventually lost followers due to its lack of scientific evidence.

Description

As part of our 2019-2020 exhibition, "Great Minds: The Brain in Medicine, Surgery and Psychiatry", we delve into the world of phrenology. Phrenology was very popular in Scotland during the early 19th century, but eventually lost followers due to its lack of scientific evidence.

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Title

Head Sections Animation

Description

The 'Atlas of head sections' consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every sectiopn was cut by William Macewen, a pioneering neurosurgeon during the 19th and 20th centuries. Together with his 'Pyogenic infective diseases of the brain and spinal cord', the 'Atlas of head sections' helped establish Macewen's international reputation as a leader in the field.

Description

The 'Atlas of head sections' consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every sectiopn was cut by William Macewen, a pioneering neurosurgeon during the 19th and 20th centuries. Together with his 'Pyogenic infective diseases of the brain and spinal cord', the 'Atlas of head sections' helped establish Macewen's international reputation as a leader in the field.

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Title

Biphasic Stimulator Animation

Description

James Sloan Mutrie Robertson is one of the unsung heroes of neurosurgery. He trained with Wilder Penfield in Montreal, and was one of the first modern neurosurgeons in the UK.

This biphasic stimulator was created by Sloan Robertson to determine the boundaries of brain lesions through electrical impulses.

Description

James Sloan Mutrie Robertson is one of the unsung heroes of neurosurgery. He trained with Wilder Penfield in Montreal, and was one of the first modern neurosurgeons in the UK.

This biphasic stimulator was created by Sloan Robertson to determine the boundaries of brain lesions through electrical impulses.

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Title

Circle of Willis Animation

Description

This animation gives insight into the circle of Willis, a key anatomical structure at the base of the brain named after English doctor, Thomas Willis.

Description


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Title

Large Missile Lodged in Face

Description

Case of an unexploded cannon shell lodged in the face of a WW2 patient. The shell was discovered after an X-ray of the head was taken, and was removed by Professor Thomas Gibson, a former president of the RCPSG.

Description

Case of an unexploded cannon shell lodged in the face of a WW2 patient. The shell was discovered after an X-ray of the head was taken, and was removed by Professor Thomas Gibson, a former president of the RCPSG.

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Title

Xrays in Glasgow

Description

In 1896, John Macintyre set up the first radiology department in the world at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Only months before had x-radiation been discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen. At this time, Macintyre was employed by Glasgow Royal infirmary as their Medical Electrician and he very quickly grasped the significance of the discovery – In March 1896, only a few months after the discovery of x-rays, Macintyre obtained permission from the hospital managers to establish an x-ray laboratory, creating the first x-ray unit in the world to provide a service to patients.

Description

In 1896, John Macintyre set up the first radiology department in the world at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Only months before had x-radiation been discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen. At this time, Macintyre was employed by Glasgow Royal infirmary as their Medical Electrician and he very quickly grasped the significance of the discovery – In March 1896, only a few months after the discovery of x-rays, Macintyre obtained permission from the hospital managers to establish an x-ray laboratory, creating the first x-ray unit in the world to provide a service to patients.

humerus comparison.jpg

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Title

Livingstone's Humerus Fracture

Description

A Fellow of the Royal College, David Livingstone was a medical missionary in Southern Africa during the 1800s. He was notoriously attacked by a lion and the mysterious anatomy of his fractured arm still puzzles people today!

In this animation we compare the anatomy of a regular humerus to that of Livingstone's after it healed.

Description

A Fellow of the Royal College, David Livingstone was a medical missionary in Southern Africa during the 1800s. He was notoriously attacked by a lion and the mysterious anatomy of his fractured arm still puzzles people today!

In this animation we compare the anatomy of a regular humerus to that of Livingstone's after it healed.

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Details

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Title

Animation on Lister's Carbolic Spray

Description

In 1897, Joseph Lister published his ground-breaking article “Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery” in the medical journal, The Lancet. This article presented Lister's initial cases where he used what would become his principle of antisepsis. It was in the Glasgow Royal Infirmary that Lister first started using carbolic as an antiseptic, heralding the beginnings of a surgical revolution.

The carbolic spray, however, was mainly employed during Lister's time as a surgeon in Edinburgh. As well as sterilising wounds, Lister aimed to sterilise the surgical environment. Hence, an operator would pump carbolic spray around the operating theatre to eradicate any germs. Unfortunately, this had detrimental effects on practitioners since they were inhaling highly concentrated carbolic acid.

Description

In 1897, Joseph Lister published his ground-breaking article “Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery” in the medical journal, The Lancet. This article presented Lister's initial cases where he used what would become his principle of antisepsis. It was in the Glasgow Royal Infirmary that Lister first started using carbolic as an antiseptic, heralding the beginnings of a surgical revolution.

The carbolic spray, however, was mainly employed during Lister's time as a surgeon in Edinburgh. As well as sterilising wounds, Lister aimed to sterilise the surgical environment. Hence, an operator would pump carbolic spray around the operating theatre to eradicate any germs. Unfortunately, this had detrimental effects on practitioners since they were inhaling highly concentrated carbolic acid.

tooth key.jpg

Details

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Title

Tooth Extraction with Dental Key

Description

Before the invention of the dental forceps in the 19th century, teeth were extracted using a variety of dental instruments. One such instrument was the "dental key", named as such due to its mechanism of use.

If a tooth was to be extracted, the dentist, (or barber surgeon), would take the tooth key and place the claw around the affected tooth. They would then turn the key as if trying to open a lock and extract the tooth. This technique was not particularly successful and would often lead to the crown of the tooth being cracked off, leaving the root still embedded in the jaw.

Thankfully, the regular use of the tooth key was phased out in the 19th century due to the introduction of the dental forceps.

Description

Before the invention of the dental forceps in the 19th century, teeth were extracted using a variety of dental instruments. One such instrument was the "dental key", named as such due to its mechanism of use.

If a tooth was to be extracted, the dentist, (or barber surgeon), would take the tooth key and place the claw around the affected tooth. They would then turn the key as if trying to open a lock and extract the tooth. This technique was not particularly successful and would often lead to the crown of the tooth being cracked off, leaving the root still embedded in the jaw.

Thankfully, the regular use of the tooth key was phased out in the 19th century due to the introduction of the dental forceps.

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Details

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Title

Animation on Lung Penetration Case

Description

During his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow, William Macewen attended to several cases in the city centre. He collected any mentions of the cases from newspapers and put them together in a clippings book, which is held within the College's archive collection.

On 11th October, 1873, a young man had been stabbed in the back during an altercation. He had complaints of feeling breathless, as if something was tugging on his throat. When Macewen examined the wound, he found that the probe extended all the way into the pleural lining of the lungs.

At this point he came into contact with a shard of the knife that had been used to stab the young man. He successfully removed the knife segment and the patient survived.

Description

During his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow, William Macewen attended to several cases in the city centre. He collected any mentions of the cases from newspapers and put them together in a clippings book, which is held within the College's archive collection.

On 11th October, 1873, a young man had been stabbed in the back during an altercation. He had complaints of feeling breathless, as if something was tugging on his throat. When Macewen examined the wound, he found that the probe extended all the way into the pleural lining of the lungs.

At this point he came into contact with a shard of the knife that had been used to stab the young man. He successfully removed the knife segment and the patient survived.

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Details

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Title

Animation on First Brain Tumour Removal

Description

In 1879, Barbara Watson came under the care of William Macewen, presenting with a large tumour over the left eye. Macewen tended to Miss Watson with his well-known skill and compassion, but little did he know that this case would become a world first in neurosurgery.

At this time, there were no methods of imaging the body non-invasively- Rontgen did not discover X-rays until 1895. Therefore, determining the dimensions of brain lesions relied on the practitioner's observations of the patient's symptoms alone. This would have required an in-depth knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the brain. Thankfully, Macewen was well-read on the current theories on the brain at that time. Miss Watson truly could not have asked for a better surgeon to help her.

Due to Miss Watson's frequent convulsions, Macewen suspected that the tumour above the left eye was in fact passing through the skull into the brain. Hence, he decided to cut into the mass and follow its trajectory. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the tumour did indeed pass through the skull and was putting pressure on the dura mater. Macewen successfully removed the tumour, under antiseptic conditions, and closed the wound. Miss Watson survived the operation and died some years later from kidney problems completely unrelated to this case.

This case became the first successful removal of a brain tumour in the world.

Description

In 1879, Barbara Watson came under the care of William Macewen, presenting with a large tumour over the left eye. Macewen tended to Miss Watson with his well-known skill and compassion, but little did he know that this case would become a world first in neurosurgery.

At this time, there were no methods of imaging the body non-invasively- Rontgen did not discover X-rays until 1895. Therefore, determining the dimensions of brain lesions relied on the practitioner's observations of the patient's symptoms alone. This would have required an in-depth knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the brain. Thankfully, Macewen was well-read on the current theories on the brain at that time. Miss Watson truly could not have asked for a better surgeon to help her.

Due to Miss Watson's frequent convulsions, Macewen suspected that the tumour above the left eye was in fact passing through the skull into the brain. Hence, he decided to cut into the mass and follow its trajectory. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the tumour did indeed pass through the skull and was putting pressure on the dura mater. Macewen successfully removed the tumour, under antiseptic conditions, and closed the wound. Miss Watson survived the operation and died some years later from kidney problems completely unrelated to this case.

This case became the first successful removal of a brain tumour in the world.

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Details

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Title

Animation on Arthur Henry Jacobs

Description

Known as "the father of urology in Glasgow", Arthur Jacobs helped to set up the first urology department in Scotland at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1950s.

Jacobs was one of the first practitioners in the UK to use intravenous pyelography to image the urinary system.

Description

Known as "the father of urology in Glasgow", Arthur Jacobs helped to set up the first urology department in Scotland at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1950s.

Jacobs was one of the first practitioners in the UK to use intravenous pyelography to image the urinary system.

2003.106_dental key 4.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Tooth Key

Description

Tooth Key from 19th century.

Date

c. 1800s

Identifier

2003/106

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

13.9 cm length

Materials

Ebony, metal.

Description

Tooth Key from 19th century.

GLA_RCPG_PCF_92.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portrait of Arthur Henry Jacobs, PRCPSG 1958-1960

Description

Seated half-length in college robes.

Date

1991

Identifier

80

Rights

© the artist's estate

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

58 x 48 cm

Materials

Oil on canvas

Description

Seated half-length in college robes.

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Details

Dublin Core

Title

Laennec Monaural Stethoscope

Description

Laennec stethoscope, wood, early 19th century.

Early monaural stethoscope as devised by Dr Rene Laennec, early 19th century. The Breton doctor, Rene Laennec of Quimper (1781-1826) first invented the stethoscope in 1816. Confronted by a stout woman with an apparent heart condition, Laennec found that he was unable to use hand or ear to examine the patient without embarrassment, so he used a tightly rolled sheaf of papers, one end of which he placed against the precordial region and the other to his ear. He was able thereby to hear the heart with greater clarity than he had ever done before. Laennec developed a stethoscope which consisted of a simple wooden cylinder that could be unscrewed in the middle for carrying in the pocket.

Creator

Rene Laennec

Date

c. 1800s

Identifier

2003/50

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 31 cm

Materials

Wood

Description

Laennec stethoscope, wood, early 19th century.

Early monaural stethoscope as devised by Dr Rene Laennec, early 19th century. The Breton doctor, Rene Laennec of Quimper (1781-1826) first invented the stethoscope in 1816. Confronted by a stout woman with an apparent heart condition, Laennec found that he was unable to use hand or ear to examine the patient without embarrassment, so he used a tightly rolled sheaf of papers, one end of which he placed against the precordial region and the other to his ear. He was able thereby to hear the heart with greater clarity than he had ever done before. Laennec developed a stethoscope which consisted of a simple wooden cylinder that could be unscrewed in the middle for carrying in the pocket.

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Details

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Title

Dr David Livingstone Humerus Cast

Description

A replica cast of David Livingstone's left humerus, showing a compound fracture which occurred when he was mauled by a lion on his first expedition. The cast being made prior to his internment in Westminster Abbey, the old healed fracture proved that the remains were indeed those of David Livingstone. It was presented to the Royal College by the Livingstone Memorial Trust in 1973 on the anniversary of his death, and is contained within a modern glazed case.

Date

c. 1874

Identifier

2006/6

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 36 cm

Materials

Plaster cast.

Description

A replica cast of David Livingstone's left humerus, showing a compound fracture which occurred when he was mauled by a lion on his first expedition. The cast being made prior to his internment in Westminster Abbey, the old healed fracture proved that the remains were indeed those of David Livingstone. It was presented to the Royal College by the Livingstone Memorial Trust in 1973 on the anniversary of his death, and is contained within a modern glazed case.


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Details

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Title

Semi-flexible Gastroscope

Description

Gastroscope, metal and rubber, in wooden case, c 1960s.

Gastroscopy today involves examining components of the gastrointestinal system by inserting a wire-like endoscope down the patient’s throat. The endoscope contains a camera and light, and is controlled by the physician performing the examination. The images from the camera are then fed to a monitor screen for visualization.
Rudolf Schindler was the brains behind the first ever semi-flexible gastroscope, created in 1931. He constructed the gastroscope in such a manner that the distal end could be rotated, while the proximal end remained stationary. This allowed easier access to all areas of the stomach.

Date

c. 1960s

Identifier

2000/10.2

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 77.4 cm

Materials

Metal, rubber, and wood.

Description

Gastroscope, metal and rubber, in wooden case, c 1960s.

Gastroscopy today involves examining components of the gastrointestinal system by inserting a wire-like endoscope down the patient’s throat. The endoscope contains a camera and light, and is controlled by the physician performing the examination. The images from the camera are then fed to a monitor screen for visualization.
Rudolf Schindler was the brains behind the first ever semi-flexible gastroscope, created in 1931. He constructed the gastroscope in such a manner that the distal end could be rotated, while the proximal end remained stationary. This allowed easier access to all areas of the stomach.

xray tube 7.17.jpg

Details

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Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1920s

Identifier

2018.11.4

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

xray tube 6.18.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1918

Identifier

2018.11.3

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

xray tube 5.2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Early glass X-ray tube designed to work with heavy currents
Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1918

Identifier

2018.11.7

Description

Early glass X-ray tube designed to work with heavy currents

2010.1.17_ambu_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

AMBU Resuscitator

Description

AMBU Resuscitator. Consists of inflatable face mask, one-way plastic and metal valve, and large red rubber self-filling bag. Also known as a BVM or "Bag valve mask".

"Reuben" refers to Henning Reuben, the Danish anaesthetist who developed the device with his German partner in 1953. Marketed from 1956 onwards.

Date

c. 1960-1970

Identifier

2010/1.17

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

6000x4000

Materials

36 x 14 cm

Description

AMBU Resuscitator. Consists of inflatable face mask, one-way plastic and metal valve, and large red rubber self-filling bag. Also known as a BVM or "Bag valve mask".

"Reuben" refers to Henning Reuben, the Danish anaesthetist who developed the device with his German partner in 1953. Marketed from 1956 onwards.

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