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  • Tags: William Macewen

10-1A-127-1_Macewen Stevenson.jpg

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Title

Letter from J. Stevenson to William Macewen

Description

Letter from Stevenson to Macewen to arrange a check up on progress.

"9 Brisbane Street, Greenock, 7th December 1914.

Dear Sir,
I was a patient under you in Ward 15 for 6 weeks in the spring of this year, and underwent an operation for the removal of the little toe on my right foot, owing to long standing skin disease.
When able to go home, you on two occasions asked me to come back, and let you see me in about six months’ time. So if you let me know any day that would suit you either this week or next. I would be very pleased to come up.
I may say that the foot healed up beautifully, and I have been back at my work since the end of June, and have enjoyed many good long walks without any ill effects. And I feel I cannot express how grateful I am, for all the benefit I have got while under your care.

Yours sincerely,

James Stevenson

P.S. I left the hospital on the 2nd of May."

Creator

J. Stevenson

Date

c. 1914

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/127

Description

Letter from Stevenson to Macewen to arrange a check up on progress.

"9 Brisbane Street, Greenock, 7th December 1914.

Dear Sir,
I was a patient under you in Ward 15 for 6 weeks in the spring of this year, and underwent an operation for the removal of the little toe on my right foot, owing to long standing skin disease.
When able to go home, you on two occasions asked me to come back, and let you see me in about six months’ time. So if you let me know any day that would suit you either this week or next. I would be very pleased to come up.
I may say that the foot healed up beautifully, and I have been back at my work since the end of June, and have enjoyed many good long walks without any ill effects. And I feel I cannot express how grateful I am, for all the benefit I have got while under your care.

Yours sincerely,

James Stevenson

P.S. I left the hospital on the 2nd of May."

10-1A-94_Macewen police letter_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from S.Mennie to William Macewen

Description

Letter of thanks from Mennie to Macewen for saving his life after a gunshot wound.

"County Police Station, Lauder. N.B., 26.2.89.

My Dear Sir,
I assure you it is no easy matter to express how truly grateful I am to you for saving my life, after having been so dangerously shot. I have every reason to be proud that I was placed under your able hand- under the care of a Surgeon whose skillful and most successful operations have gained for him a universal reputation. I am confident that I would not have been so promptly and successfully operated upon by any other Surgeon- which makes me all the more thankful. I am also glad to state that the the very careful way which I was nursed and the kind way which I was treated by your Nurses (in my opinion) contributed largely towards my speedy recovery. My friends and all who know me are highly pleased to see me discharged by you in such a satisfactory condition. I again thank you from my heart, and also your subordinates for their very kind attention. I trust you will accept of the enclosed small gift as a token of my appreciation of your most valuable services to me.

I am
My Dear Sir,
Yours Respectfully,

S. Mennie.

Creator

S. Mennie

Date

c. 1889

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/94

Description

Letter of thanks from Mennie to Macewen for saving his life after a gunshot wound.

"County Police Station, Lauder. N.B., 26.2.89.

My Dear Sir,
I assure you it is no easy matter to express how truly grateful I am to you for saving my life, after having been so dangerously shot. I have every reason to be proud that I was placed under your able hand- under the care of a Surgeon whose skillful and most successful operations have gained for him a universal reputation. I am confident that I would not have been so promptly and successfully operated upon by any other Surgeon- which makes me all the more thankful. I am also glad to state that the the very careful way which I was nursed and the kind way which I was treated by your Nurses (in my opinion) contributed largely towards my speedy recovery. My friends and all who know me are highly pleased to see me discharged by you in such a satisfactory condition. I again thank you from my heart, and also your subordinates for their very kind attention. I trust you will accept of the enclosed small gift as a token of my appreciation of your most valuable services to me.

I am
My Dear Sir,
Yours Respectfully,

S. Mennie.

10-1A-92-2_card_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Christmas Card

Description

Christmas card from Y.Masaki, a previous patient of William Macewen.

Date

c. 1913

Identifier

RCPSG 10/14/92/2

Description

Christmas card from Y.Masaki, a previous patient of William Macewen.

10-1A-92-1_Macewen Masaki_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from Y.Masaki to William Macewen

Description

This letter details thanks given from Masaki to Macewen for treatment received and a report on his progress.

"25, Hijikki Machi, Ushigome, Tokio.
5-12-13

Dear Sir Pro. Macewen,
I cannot ignore without sending an information about my condition, since I have got home. I am be able to walk a few miles without help of any stick and to move up my left arm with light thing now, moreover they are improving continuously still. Many friends of mine, who meet me when I have got home, were surprised about your cleverness and skillfulness, which let me be recovered so good.
I was expected, before I left England, that I must go in reserve list connection with my injured limbs, but I am remaining in an active service now that is your merit.
I venture to send a little cigar case to commemorate my limbs’ recovery by your treat, in the hope that you may perhaps like to make use of it.
Please give my kind regards to Lady Macquwen and Dr John.

Yours sincerely,

Y. Masaki"

Creator

Y. Masaki

Date

c. 1913

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/92/1

Description

This letter details thanks given from Masaki to Macewen for treatment received and a report on his progress.

"25, Hijikki Machi, Ushigome, Tokio.
5-12-13

Dear Sir Pro. Macewen,
I cannot ignore without sending an information about my condition, since I have got home. I am be able to walk a few miles without help of any stick and to move up my left arm with light thing now, moreover they are improving continuously still. Many friends of mine, who meet me when I have got home, were surprised about your cleverness and skillfulness, which let me be recovered so good.
I was expected, before I left England, that I must go in reserve list connection with my injured limbs, but I am remaining in an active service now that is your merit.
I venture to send a little cigar case to commemorate my limbs’ recovery by your treat, in the hope that you may perhaps like to make use of it.
Please give my kind regards to Lady Macquwen and Dr John.

Yours sincerely,

Y. Masaki"

10-1A-5-1_Macewen Allan_1.jpg

Details

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Title

Letter from William Macewen to J.W.Allan

Description

This letter describes the feelings of friends on Allan's departure for China.

"13 Bath Street, March 5 1872.

James W. Allan.

My dear Friend,
I have received with much pleasure the news, both of the telegram and the letter; each in this season; announcing your safe arrival at the proximal extremity of your China journey. And I will weary till I have a telegram from Liverpool intimating your safe return.
I cannot describe to you, the feeling of that walk home on Sunday night. There seemed to be a wonderful lack of words, and a silent confusion pervaded all of us, as we tottered slowly down the streets, until, last of all, the silence began to be quite unbearable, and each tried to speak: but, the broken, semi-spasmodic sentences, which were uttered, only showed, too plainly, that our minds were on a very different subject from our tongues. Sutherland, remained quietly on the sofa, for a long time, and at last gave vent to a queer expression, emanating from the depths of the trachea, then a faint smile, lit for a moment his swarthy face, but only to make the dull eyes, still more dull and dismal, as if the lower part of his face was masking the upper: and shifting himself uneasily on the sofa he said “Hell man! Jamie is really away to China.” “It’s queer isn’t it.” And after a short interval, all of us, by one desire, wanted to separate. We wanted to be alone. So Archie and I drawing closer to each other than usual & holding each others arms firmer than our want, passed slowly down to the bridge, and for a little time looked sadly into the dark flowing river, which reflected the flickering lights and with promises to meet soon, grasped hands and departed; and the sorrow in Archie’s eye I still see: calm and deep.
There is a sort of dread hanging over me, which I hope will soon vanish. We may never meet again, here. You or I may leave this earth ere from ____, one sent into the past: but if it should be, we will know: whoever goes, that it will only be to participate the sooner in the mysteries of the eternal. One thing will never be shaken [:] our love for each other.

May God be with us.

William Macewen."

Creator

William Macewen

Date

c. 1872

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/5/1

Description

This letter describes the feelings of friends on Allan's departure for China.

"13 Bath Street, March 5 1872.

James W. Allan.

My dear Friend,
I have received with much pleasure the news, both of the telegram and the letter; each in this season; announcing your safe arrival at the proximal extremity of your China journey. And I will weary till I have a telegram from Liverpool intimating your safe return.
I cannot describe to you, the feeling of that walk home on Sunday night. There seemed to be a wonderful lack of words, and a silent confusion pervaded all of us, as we tottered slowly down the streets, until, last of all, the silence began to be quite unbearable, and each tried to speak: but, the broken, semi-spasmodic sentences, which were uttered, only showed, too plainly, that our minds were on a very different subject from our tongues. Sutherland, remained quietly on the sofa, for a long time, and at last gave vent to a queer expression, emanating from the depths of the trachea, then a faint smile, lit for a moment his swarthy face, but only to make the dull eyes, still more dull and dismal, as if the lower part of his face was masking the upper: and shifting himself uneasily on the sofa he said “Hell man! Jamie is really away to China.” “It’s queer isn’t it.” And after a short interval, all of us, by one desire, wanted to separate. We wanted to be alone. So Archie and I drawing closer to each other than usual & holding each others arms firmer than our want, passed slowly down to the bridge, and for a little time looked sadly into the dark flowing river, which reflected the flickering lights and with promises to meet soon, grasped hands and departed; and the sorrow in Archie’s eye I still see: calm and deep.
There is a sort of dread hanging over me, which I hope will soon vanish. We may never meet again, here. You or I may leave this earth ere from ____, one sent into the past: but if it should be, we will know: whoever goes, that it will only be to participate the sooner in the mysteries of the eternal. One thing will never be shaken [:] our love for each other.

May God be with us.

William Macewen."

10_1A_30_1_macintyre letter_3.jpg

Details

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Title

J. W. MacIntyre to Comrie.

Description

Two copies of a letter and notes about x-ray work at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Creator

John Macintyre

Date

c. 1928

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/30/1-3

Description

Two copies of a letter and notes about x-ray work at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

11_2_1_lister card_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Lord Lister's Visiting Card

Description

Lister's visiting card "To introduce Professor Boltini to William Macewen."

Date

c. N.D.

Identifier

RCPSG 11/2/1

Description

Lister's visiting card "To introduce Professor Boltini to William Macewen."

Macewenoperating dd232_web.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

William Macewen in Operating Theatre

Description

Photograph of William MacEwen in operating theatre. Note the white labcoats and rubber gloves, which were part of his movement away from antisepsis towards asepsis. Macewen is on the left and on the right is his colleague, James Hogarth Pringle.

Date

c. N.D.

Identifier

RCPSG 23/5/2/6

Relation

Description

Photograph of William MacEwen in operating theatre. Note the white labcoats and rubber gloves, which were part of his movement away from antisepsis towards asepsis. Macewen is on the left and on the right is his colleague, James Hogarth Pringle.

Barbara_watson.jpg

Details

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Title

Photograph of Barbara Watson

Description

This photograph is of Barbara Watson, the first person to successfully survive a brain tumour removal operation in 1879.

This photograph is part of Macewen's surgical casebook in the archive collection.

Creator

Sir William Macewen

Date

c. 1879

Identifier

RCPSG 10/9/1

Description

This photograph is of Barbara Watson, the first person to successfully survive a brain tumour removal operation in 1879.

This photograph is part of Macewen's surgical casebook in the archive collection.

head sections 2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Atlas of Head Sections

Description

The ‘Atlas of head sections’ consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every head section was cut by Macewen himself.

Creator

Sir William Macewen

Date

c. 1893

Identifier

WE 705 MAC

Publisher

Glasgow: James Maclehose and sons

Language

English

Description

The ‘Atlas of head sections’ consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every head section was cut by Macewen himself.

barbara watson_journal_1.jpg

Details

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Title

Private journal of William Macewen

Description

This journal records Macewen’s notes of surgical cases admitted to Glasgow Royal Infirmary between 1876 and 1879. The College archive contains nine volumes of Macewen’s cases at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, between 1876 and 1895.

Creator

Sir William Macewen

Date

c. 1876-1879

Identifier

RCPSG 10/9/1

Description

This journal records Macewen’s notes of surgical cases admitted to Glasgow Royal Infirmary between 1876 and 1879. The College archive contains nine volumes of Macewen’s cases at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, between 1876 and 1895.

RCPSG 10_1A_132_1.jpg

Details

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Title

Letter from A. Tisdall to William Macewen

Description

Details of a patient suicide in 1890, probably at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Creator

A. Tisdall

Date

c. 1897

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/132

Description

Details of a patient suicide in 1890, probably at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

4_1_2_glasgow path_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Glasgow Pathological Society Minute Book

Description

One of the minute books of the Glasgow Pathological and Clinical Society dating from 1879-1891.

Date

c. 1879-1891

Identifier

RCPSG 4/1/2

Description

One of the minute books of the Glasgow Pathological and Clinical Society dating from 1879-1891.

macewen_mallet.png

Details

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Title

3D Scan of Hammer from Macewen's Theatre

Description

3D scan of a wooden surgical mallet used in the surgical ward of Sir William Macewen.

Description

3D scan of a wooden surgical mallet used in the surgical ward of Sir William Macewen.

atlas.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Head Sections Animation

Description

The 'Atlas of head sections' consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every sectiopn was cut by William Macewen, a pioneering neurosurgeon during the 19th and 20th centuries. Together with his 'Pyogenic infective diseases of the brain and spinal cord', the 'Atlas of head sections' helped establish Macewen's international reputation as a leader in the field.

Description

The 'Atlas of head sections' consists of 53 engraved copperplates of frozen sections of the head. Every sectiopn was cut by William Macewen, a pioneering neurosurgeon during the 19th and 20th centuries. Together with his 'Pyogenic infective diseases of the brain and spinal cord', the 'Atlas of head sections' helped establish Macewen's international reputation as a leader in the field.

barbara_watson.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Barbara Watson Model

Description

This 3D model is a representation of the first patient to survive the removal of a brain tumour, Barbara Watson. She was operated on by William Macewen in 1879 and survived the operation. This was the first successful brain tumour removal in history.

Description

This 3D model is a representation of the first patient to survive the removal of a brain tumour, Barbara Watson. She was operated on by William Macewen in 1879 and survived the operation. This was the first successful brain tumour removal in history.

murder map.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

William Macewen Police Surgery Map

Description

This interactive map was created in order to visualise some of the cases attended to by William Macewen during his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow.

The cases were documented in several local newspapers of the late 19th century, and Macewen collected several clippings of articles in which he was mentioned. These clippings are found in one of Macewen's scrapbooks, which is now held in the College's archive collection.

In this map you are able to read excerpts of the cases from different newspapers. Learn about a stabbing case in Ropework Lane, a suspicious death in the Old Wynd, and rotten fish being sold on the High Street!

Description

This interactive map was created in order to visualise some of the cases attended to by William Macewen during his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow.

The cases were documented in several local newspapers of the late 19th century, and Macewen collected several clippings of articles in which he was mentioned. These clippings are found in one of Macewen's scrapbooks, which is now held in the College's archive collection.

In this map you are able to read excerpts of the cases from different newspapers. Learn about a stabbing case in Ropework Lane, a suspicious death in the Old Wynd, and rotten fish being sold on the High Street!

stabbing case.jpg

Details

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Title

Animation on Lung Penetration Case

Description

During his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow, William Macewen attended to several cases in the city centre. He collected any mentions of the cases from newspapers and put them together in a clippings book, which is held within the College's archive collection.

On 11th October, 1873, a young man had been stabbed in the back during an altercation. He had complaints of feeling breathless, as if something was tugging on his throat. When Macewen examined the wound, he found that the probe extended all the way into the pleural lining of the lungs.

At this point he came into contact with a shard of the knife that had been used to stab the young man. He successfully removed the knife segment and the patient survived.

Description

During his time as a police surgeon in Glasgow, William Macewen attended to several cases in the city centre. He collected any mentions of the cases from newspapers and put them together in a clippings book, which is held within the College's archive collection.

On 11th October, 1873, a young man had been stabbed in the back during an altercation. He had complaints of feeling breathless, as if something was tugging on his throat. When Macewen examined the wound, he found that the probe extended all the way into the pleural lining of the lungs.

At this point he came into contact with a shard of the knife that had been used to stab the young man. He successfully removed the knife segment and the patient survived.

tumour_new.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Animation on First Brain Tumour Removal

Description

In 1879, Barbara Watson came under the care of William Macewen, presenting with a large tumour over the left eye. Macewen tended to Miss Watson with his well-known skill and compassion, but little did he know that this case would become a world first in neurosurgery.

At this time, there were no methods of imaging the body non-invasively- Rontgen did not discover X-rays until 1895. Therefore, determining the dimensions of brain lesions relied on the practitioner's observations of the patient's symptoms alone. This would have required an in-depth knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the brain. Thankfully, Macewen was well-read on the current theories on the brain at that time. Miss Watson truly could not have asked for a better surgeon to help her.

Due to Miss Watson's frequent convulsions, Macewen suspected that the tumour above the left eye was in fact passing through the skull into the brain. Hence, he decided to cut into the mass and follow its trajectory. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the tumour did indeed pass through the skull and was putting pressure on the dura mater. Macewen successfully removed the tumour, under antiseptic conditions, and closed the wound. Miss Watson survived the operation and died some years later from kidney problems completely unrelated to this case.

This case became the first successful removal of a brain tumour in the world.

Description

In 1879, Barbara Watson came under the care of William Macewen, presenting with a large tumour over the left eye. Macewen tended to Miss Watson with his well-known skill and compassion, but little did he know that this case would become a world first in neurosurgery.

At this time, there were no methods of imaging the body non-invasively- Rontgen did not discover X-rays until 1895. Therefore, determining the dimensions of brain lesions relied on the practitioner's observations of the patient's symptoms alone. This would have required an in-depth knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the brain. Thankfully, Macewen was well-read on the current theories on the brain at that time. Miss Watson truly could not have asked for a better surgeon to help her.

Due to Miss Watson's frequent convulsions, Macewen suspected that the tumour above the left eye was in fact passing through the skull into the brain. Hence, he decided to cut into the mass and follow its trajectory. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the tumour did indeed pass through the skull and was putting pressure on the dura mater. Macewen successfully removed the tumour, under antiseptic conditions, and closed the wound. Miss Watson survived the operation and died some years later from kidney problems completely unrelated to this case.

This case became the first successful removal of a brain tumour in the world.

osteotome.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

3D Model of Osteotome

Description

Displayed here is a 3D animated model showing the mechanism of an osteotome, a medical instrument designed by Sir William Macewen.

William Macewen was a surgeon in Glasgow during the late 19th century and early 20th century. He pioneered many clinical specialities, including orthopaedics. He designed his version of the osteotome in the 1870s, and wrote an in depth account of its design in his publication, "Osteotomy with an inquiry into the aetiology and pathology of knock-knee, bow-leg, and other osseous deformities of the lower limbs."

He explains:

"The osteotome is an instrument of the chisel order, bevelled on both sides, so as to resemble a very slender wedge...The osteotome is used only for making simple incisions, or wedge-shaped openings without removal of bone."

Description

William Macewen Osteotome by RCPSG Heritage on Sketchfab

1-20-2-10-55_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain showing a potential lesion surrounding the central sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/55

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain showing a potential lesion surrounding the central sulcus.

1-20-2-10-56_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting parts of the parietal and temporal lobes.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/56

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting parts of the parietal and temporal lobes.

1-20-2-10-53_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain showing a potential lesion of the frontal lobe.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/53

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain showing a potential lesion of the frontal lobe.

1-20-2-10-54_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting a region of the pre-central gyrus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/54

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting a region of the pre-central gyrus.

1-20-2-10-51_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area around the lateral sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/51

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area around the lateral sulcus.

1-20-2-10-52_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting potential lesions on either side of the central sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/52

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting potential lesions on either side of the central sulcus.

1-20-2-10-49_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area around the central sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/49

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area around the central sulcus.

1-20-2-10-50_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting a region around the central sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/50

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting a region around the central sulcus.

1-20-2-10-46_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area of the central sulcus.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/46

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of the brain highlighting an area of the central sulcus.

1-20-2-10-47_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print diagram of the brain highlighting regions of the pre- and post-central gyri.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/47

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print diagram of the brain highlighting regions of the pre- and post-central gyri.

1-20-2-10-48_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Print of a diagram of the brain highlighting a region of the temporal lobe.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/48

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Print of a diagram of the brain highlighting a region of the temporal lobe.

1-20-2-10-45_brain.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Diagram of the Brain

Description

Small print of a lateral view of the brain, highlighting a potential lesion in the frontal lobe.

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/45

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper

Description

Small print of a lateral view of the brain, highlighting a potential lesion in the frontal lobe.

1-20-2-11_cerebellum_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Sketch of the Cerebellum

Description

Sketch of the cerebellum by Dr Anglin Whitelock, House Surgeon to Sir William Macewen

Date

c. 1887-1909

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/2/10/11

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Paper, coloured pencil

Description

Sketch of the cerebellum by Dr Anglin Whitelock, House Surgeon to Sir William Macewen

2003.20_macewen medal cast 5.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

William Macewen Medal Cast

Description

Cast for Macewen medal in surgery. On 7th March 1927, presentation by Dr J.A.C. Macewen of a medal in commemoration of the late Sir William Macewen to be presented annually to a candidate who, having received surgical training in a Glasgow hospital, obtains the highest distinction in surgery at the final examinations conducted by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and the Edinburgh College.

Date

c. 1927

Identifier

2003/20

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Diameter: 9.1 cm

Materials

Metal

Description

Cast for Macewen medal in surgery. On 7th March 1927, presentation by Dr J.A.C. Macewen of a medal in commemoration of the late Sir William Macewen to be presented annually to a candidate who, having received surgical training in a Glasgow hospital, obtains the highest distinction in surgery at the final examinations conducted by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and the Edinburgh College.

macewen mallet.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Hammer from Macewen's theatre

Description

Wooden surgical mallet/hammer. Silver plate on one face with engraving indicating the hammer was used in William Macewen's surgical theatre at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary: "Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Founded 1792. Hammer from Sir William Macewen's theatre"

Date

19th century - 20th century

Identifier

455

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length = 30 cm; Width = 10 cm; Depth = 7 cm

Materials

wood
silver

Description

Wooden surgical mallet/hammer. Silver plate on one face with engraving indicating the hammer was used in William Macewen's surgical theatre at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary: "Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Founded 1792. Hammer from Sir William Macewen's theatre"

box 2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Gavel casket

Description

Gavel casket made using timber from the former Lister Ward of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary (demolished 1924). An illustration of the original GRI building (demolished 1912) carved on the front. The handles on the sides are carved with the emblem and motto of the GRI. Emblem and motto of Clan Jardine carved on the back. Photograph inside the lid of Andrew and William Brown. Box contains hammer from Macewen's theatre (object number 455) and Royal Faculty anniversary gavel (object number 456).

Silver plate on top of box: "Presented to the Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow on the 29th November, 1949, and to perpetuate the memory of Andrew and William Brown J.P., who as instrument makers to the Royal Infirmary served the great surgeons Lord Lister and Sir William Macewen, by Mr. Andrew Jardine, newphew of Messrs. Brown. This casket is made of timber from the Lister Ward of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Built 1859 - Demolished 1924."

Carving on front of box: Image of the original GRI building; "The original Glasgow Royal Infirmary 1794-1912".

Handles on sides of box: Thistle and serpent emblem of the GRI; "Auspice Caelo".

Carving on back of box: Emblem and motto of Clan Jardine, "Cave Adsum"; "The founder George Jardine, Professor of Logic, Old College Glasgow".

Creator

Hugh Kirkpatrick, Manufacturer

Date

c.1949

Identifier

454

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Height = 16 cm; Width = 41.5 cm; Depth = 22 cm.

Materials

wood
silver

Description

Gavel casket made using timber from the former Lister Ward of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary (demolished 1924). An illustration of the original GRI building (demolished 1912) carved on the front. The handles on the sides are carved with the emblem and motto of the GRI. Emblem and motto of Clan Jardine carved on the back. Photograph inside the lid of Andrew and William Brown. Box contains hammer from Macewen's theatre (object number 455) and Royal Faculty anniversary gavel (object number 456).

Silver plate on top of box: "Presented to the Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow on the 29th November, 1949, and to perpetuate the memory of Andrew and William Brown J.P., who as instrument makers to the Royal Infirmary served the great surgeons Lord Lister and Sir William Macewen, by Mr. Andrew Jardine, newphew of Messrs. Brown. This casket is made of timber from the Lister Ward of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Built 1859 - Demolished 1924."

Carving on front of box: Image of the original GRI building; "The original Glasgow Royal Infirmary 1794-1912".

Handles on sides of box: Thistle and serpent emblem of the GRI; "Auspice Caelo".

Carving on back of box: Emblem and motto of Clan Jardine, "Cave Adsum"; "The founder George Jardine, Professor of Logic, Old College Glasgow".

GLA_RCPG_PCF_6[1].jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portrait of J. Hogarth Pringle FRCS 1863-1941

Description

Bust-length against a dark background.

Date

20th century

Identifier

95

Rights

© the artist's estate / Bridgeman Images

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

49 x 39.5 cm

Materials

oil on canvas

Description

Bust-length against a dark background.

GLA_RCPG_PCF_4.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portrait of William Macewen, CB DCL FRS 1848-1924

Description

Seated three-quarter length in a black suit against a dark background.
Macewen was a surgeon who worked in several hospitals in Glasgow, including the Royal Infirmary and the Western Infirmary. He was a pioneer of modern brain surgery and developed a number of operating techniques in bone surgery. He was also an early proponent of aseptic procedures in the operating theatre and often had surgical instruments and theatre furniture designed to his own specifications.

Date

20th century

Identifier

91

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

36" x 28"

Materials

Oil on canvas

Description

Seated three-quarter length in a black suit against a dark background.

2003.8_Osteotome 3 27th.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Macewen's Osteotomes

Description

Set of osteotomes, made by a Glasgow blacksmith, T. H. Macdonald, according to the specifications of the surgeon, Sir William Macewen. This was a new type of instrument devised and named by Macewen and used alongside the chisel in bone operations. The manufacture of the osteotomes was described in detail in Macewen's book, "Osteotomy", published in 1880. This particular set of osteotomes was used by Macewen with great success and he performed hundreds of osteotomies with them.

Date

1875

Identifier

2003/8

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 21.3 cm

Materials

Stainless Steel

Description

Set of osteotomes, made by a Glasgow blacksmith, T. H. Macdonald, according to the specifications of the surgeon, Sir William Macewen. This was a new type of instrument devised and named by Macewen and used alongside the chisel in bone operations. The manufacture of the osteotomes was described in detail in Macewen's book, "Osteotomy", published in 1880. This particular set of osteotomes was used by Macewen with great success and he performed hundreds of osteotomies with them.

table.gif

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Operating Table used by Sir William Macewen

Description

Sir William Macewen (1848-1924) carried out surgery using this operating table at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. The table, which is wooden, is mounted on wheels and has a mechanism enabling it to be raised at one end. It was discovered by a porter in an old storeroom in the McKelvie Hospital, Oban and was presented to the College by the Board of Management for Oban and District Hospitals in 1954.

Sir William Macewen was a surgeon who attempted operations which had never been done before. His work can be divided into three broad categories: surgical cure of hernia; surgical solutions for problems of the bones and joints; and surgical solutions for afflictions of the central nervous system. In 1874 Macewen became a Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and in November of the same year he was appointed to the staff of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. This appointment marked the beginning of a period of great activity and illustrious achievements. As a former student of Lister's, Macewen moved beyond Lister's precedents by seeking to create the ideal germ-free conditions in his operating theatre.

Macewen's scrupulous attention to detail involved the meticulous preparation of his own hands and arms before surgery, and those of his nurses and assistants. For surgery he dressed in a gown which could be sterilised between operations, to the derision of many of his contemporaries. Sir William Macewen had his own instruments made, formed from a single piece of steel, in order to ensure that they were fully sterile.

When Macewen was working at the Royal Infirmary his nurses purchased a fish kettle to be used for sterilising instruments, after the hospital authorities had refused to fund a container for the purpose. In 1892 Macewen became Regius Professor of Surgery at the University of Glasgow and transferred his surgical activities from the Royal to the Western Infirmary. In 1913 he became an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Date

c. 1800s

Identifier

2006/3

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 180 cm

Materials

Wood

Description

Sir William Macewen (1848-1924) carried out surgery using this operating table at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. The table, which is wooden, is mounted on wheels and has a mechanism enabling it to be raised at one end. It was discovered by a porter in an old storeroom in the McKelvie Hospital, Oban and was presented to the College by the Board of Management for Oban and District Hospitals in 1954.

Sir William Macewen was a surgeon who attempted operations which had never been done before. His work can be divided into three broad categories: surgical cure of hernia; surgical solutions for problems of the bones and joints; and surgical solutions for afflictions of the central nervous system. In 1874 Macewen became a Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and in November of the same year he was appointed to the staff of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. This appointment marked the beginning of a period of great activity and illustrious achievements. As a former student of Lister's, Macewen moved beyond Lister's precedents by seeking to create the ideal germ-free conditions in his operating theatre.

Macewen's scrupulous attention to detail involved the meticulous preparation of his own hands and arms before surgery, and those of his nurses and assistants. For surgery he dressed in a gown which could be sterilised between operations, to the derision of many of his contemporaries. Sir William Macewen had his own instruments made, formed from a single piece of steel, in order to ensure that they were fully sterile.

When Macewen was working at the Royal Infirmary his nurses purchased a fish kettle to be used for sterilising instruments, after the hospital authorities had refused to fund a container for the purpose. In 1892 Macewen became Regius Professor of Surgery at the University of Glasgow and transferred his surgical activities from the Royal to the Western Infirmary. In 1913 he became an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

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