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  • Tags: Medical Imaging

2000.8.1_endoscope.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Endoscope

Description

Metal endoscope held within a plastic case.

Date

c. 1990s

Identifier

2000/8.1

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 33 cm

Materials

Metal; plastic

Description

Metal endoscope held within a plastic case.

xray tube 7.17.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1920s

Identifier

2018.11.4

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

xray tube 6.18.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1918

Identifier

2018.11.3

Description

Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

xray tube 5.2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Heavy current x-ray tube

Description

Early glass X-ray tube designed to work with heavy currents
Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1918

Identifier

2018.11.7

Description

Early glass X-ray tube designed to work with heavy currents

xray tube 4.3.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Valve tube

Description

Valve tubes were put in circuit with x-ray tubes of the gas type to suppress the harmful inverse current which was liable to occur with induction coils.
Used in the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unit in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre. After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Date

c. 1896?

Identifier

2018.11.8

Description

Valve tubes were put in circuit with x-ray tubes of the gas type to suppress the harmful inverse current which was liable to occur with induction coils.

xray tube 2.1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Geissler tube

Description

Glass discharge tube on black wooden stand, of the decorative type introduced by Geissler.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1896?

Identifier

2018.11.5

Description

Glass discharge tube on black wooden stand, of the decorative type introduced by Geissler.

xray tube 1.1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Small current x-ray tube

Description

Glass X-ray tube, designed for small currents and probably of German manufacture
Pictured here is an X-ray tube originally from the Radiology Department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Glasgow was the first city in the world to have an official radiology unity in a hospital, set up by physician and engineer, Dr John Macintyre.
After the discovery of X-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, Macintyre demonstrated the use of X-rays in medicine and went on to set up the radiology department of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary in 1896.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1909

Identifier

2018.11.6

Coverage

Germany?

Description

Glass X-ray tube, designed for small currents and probably of German manufacture

jackson xray tube 1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Jackson Focus X-ray Tube

Description

Designed by Professor Herbert Jackson of King's College, London in 1894, for experiments with cathode rays, this type of tube was found to be ideal as a means of generating X-rays, following their discovery by Roentgen in 1895.

The cathode is made of aluminium and 'dished' to focus the electron beam emanating from it onto the so-called anti-cathode or anode. This is formed from a small piece of platinum set at an angle of 45 degrees to the axis of the tube, to direct the beam of cathode rays (and X-rays) through the side of the tube for convenience in use. The centre of the anode has become perforated due to bombardment by electrons.

This would have destroyed the effectiveness of the tube; a common problem because of the thinness of the platinum used. Although the tube was not designed for the production of X-rays, the focussed beam of X-rays originating from a point source made it ideal for X-ray photography, giving much sharper images than had been produced hitherto, and heralding the beginning of clinical radiology. Some three months after Roentgen's discovery in November 1895, Professor Salvioni of Perugia produced a device consisting of a fluoroscopic screen and a Jackson tube which he called a Cryptoscope. Dr John Macintyre in Glasgow and others recognised the value of this apparatus in examining patients and they were used in clinical practice within a few months.

In such gas tubes with a partial vacuum, use of the tube caused the vacuum to be increased, so-called 'hardening of the tube', reducing the current passing through it, and the output of X-rays. To overcome this difficulty, various means of introducing gas into the tube were developed. A small quantity of potassium hydroxide, or iron covered with sealing wax, was heated in the side arm of the tube releasing a little gas and thus reducing the vacuum. It was good practice in those days to have several tubes of differing 'hardness' available for different clinical applications.

This particular tube was used by Dr John Macintyre in the first functioning Radiology Department in the U.K. in the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow. It was manufactured by C.H.F. Muller of Hamburg to Dr Macintyre's specification. (Information supplied by G.R. Sutherland, FRCP Glasg).

Date

c. 1895

Identifier

2018.11.1

Description

Designed by Professor Herbert Jackson of King's College, London in 1894, for experiments with cathode rays, this type of tube was found to be ideal as a means of generating X-rays, following their discovery by Roentgen in 1895.

The cathode is made of aluminium and 'dished' to focus the electron beam emanating from it onto the so-called anti-cathode or anode. This is formed from a small piece of platinum set at an angle of 45 degrees to the axis of the tube, to direct the beam of cathode rays (and X-rays) through the side of the tube for convenience in use. The centre of the anode has become perforated due to bombardment by electrons.

This would have destroyed the effectiveness of the tube; a common problem because of the thinness of the platinum used. Although the tube was not designed for the production of X-rays, the focussed beam of X-rays originating from a point source made it ideal for X-ray photography, giving much sharper images than had been produced hitherto, and heralding the beginning of clinical radiology. Some three months after Roentgen's discovery in November 1895, Professor Salvioni of Perugia produced a device consisting of a fluoroscopic screen and a Jackson tube which he called a Cryptoscope. Dr John Macintyre in Glasgow and others recognised the value of this apparatus in examining patients and they were used in clinical practice within a few months.

In such gas tubes with a partial vacuum, use of the tube caused the vacuum to be increased, so-called 'hardening of the tube', reducing the current passing through it, and the output of X-rays. To overcome this difficulty, various means of introducing gas into the tube were developed. A small quantity of potassium hydroxide, or iron covered with sealing wax, was heated in the side arm of the tube releasing a little gas and thus reducing the vacuum. It was good practice in those days to have several tubes of differing 'hardness' available for different clinical applications.

This particular tube was used by Dr John Macintyre in the first functioning Radiology Department in the U.K. in the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow. It was manufactured by C.H.F. Muller of Hamburg to Dr Macintyre's specification. (Information supplied by G.R. Sutherland, FRCP Glasg).

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