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burns_loan_1.jpg

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Title

Cast of the Cranium of Robert Burns

Description

This cast is believed to be a copy of the originals, produced in the 19th century. It was in the possession of Murdoch Cameron, Professor of Midwifery at the University of Glasgow. Cameron then gave the cast to John Cleland, Professor of Anatomy, whose collection is housed in the University’s Museum of Anatomy.

This item is on loan to the College from the Hunterian Museum.

Date

c. 1800s

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Cast material

Description

This cast is believed to be a copy of the originals, produced in the 19th century. It was in the possession of Murdoch Cameron, Professor of Midwifery at the University of Glasgow. Cameron then gave the cast to John Cleland, Professor of Anatomy, whose collection is housed in the University’s Museum of Anatomy.

This item is on loan to the College from the Hunterian Museum.

burns.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Cast of the Cranium of Robert Burns

Description

In 1834 the body of Scotland’s national bard, Robert Burns, was exhumed from his grave in Dumfries. The exhumation was supervised by local surgeon Archibald Blacklock, who had an interest in phrenology. A plaster cast was taken of the skull, and Blacklock noted that “nothing could exceed the high state of preservation in which we found the bones of the cranium, or offer a fairer opportunity of supplying what has so long been desiderated by Phrenologists - a correct model of our immortal Poet’s head”. George Combe, a leading phrenologist, examined the cast and published his analysis in Edinburgh in 1834.

Three casts were made during the 1834 exhumation. This cast is believed to be a copy produced later in the 19th century. It was in the possession of Murdoch Cameron, Professor of Midwifery at the University of Glasgow. Cameron then gave the cast to John Cleland, Professor of Anatomy, whose collection is housed in the University’s Museum of Anatomy.

This item is on loan from The Hunterian, University of Glasgow.

Description

In 1834 the body of Scotland’s national bard, Robert Burns, was exhumed from his grave in Dumfries. The exhumation was supervised by local surgeon Archibald Blacklock, who had an interest in phrenology. A plaster cast was taken of the skull, and Blacklock noted that “nothing could exceed the high state of preservation in which we found the bones of the cranium, or offer a fairer opportunity of supplying what has so long been desiderated by Phrenologists - a correct model of our immortal Poet’s head”. George Combe, a leading phrenologist, examined the cast and published his analysis in Edinburgh in 1834.

Three casts were made during the 1834 exhumation. This cast is believed to be a copy produced later in the 19th century. It was in the possession of Murdoch Cameron, Professor of Midwifery at the University of Glasgow. Cameron then gave the cast to John Cleland, Professor of Anatomy, whose collection is housed in the University’s Museum of Anatomy.

This item is on loan from The Hunterian, University of Glasgow.

GLA_RCPG_PCF_22[1].jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portrait of John Moore MD 1730-1802

Description

Bust-length portrait with a landscape background.
John Moore was a surgeon first, later a physician, and also a man of letters. He began his medical career with the North British Fusiliers and, after studying in London and Paris, spent much of his career working in Glasgow.

Upon his retirement from medical practice in 1777, Moore moved to London and began publishing accounts of his travel experiences as well as several novels. It was during this time that he began a correspondence with the man now known as Scotland’s national poet, Robert Burns. Burns wrote a long, autobiographical letter to Moore in 1787, which has formed the basis of the most credible biographies of Burns.

A statue of his son, Sir John Moore of Corunna, stands in George Square.

Creator

James Barr (active 1860s–1892) ; Manner of Sir George Romney (Chrisite's 1989) / Sir Thomas Lawrence (Gibson, 1984)

Date

19th century

Identifier

35

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

oil on canvas

Description

Bust-length portrait with a landscape background.

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