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Edward Jenner Letter

Details

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Title

Edward Jenner Letter

Description

Letter from Edward Jenner to Col Brisbane on vaccine inoculation.

“Dr Jenner presents compliments to Col. Brisbane and has enclosed one of Mr Creaser’s papers on the mode of conducting the process of vaccine inoculation. It contains information that may prove [especially] useful to those practitioners who have not had it in their power to obtain a correct knowledge of it.”

Creator

Edward Jenner

Date

c. 1801

Identifier

RCPSG 1/20/11/24

Description

Letter from Edward Jenner to Col Brisbane on vaccine inoculation.

“Dr Jenner presents compliments to Col. Brisbane and has enclosed one of Mr Creaser’s papers on the mode of conducting the process of vaccine inoculation. It contains information that may prove [especially] useful to those practitioners who have not had it in their power to obtain a correct knowledge of it.”

Lister to Dr. Paterson on Tuberculosis

Details

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Title

Lister to Dr. Paterson on Tuberculosis

Description

A letter of correspondence from Joseph Lister on Dr Peter Paterson's experiments on humans with tuberculosis vaccine, and on the simplification of his sterilisation procedure.

Creator

Joseph Lister

Date

c. 1906

Identifier

RCPSG 11/1/30

Description

A letter of correspondence from Joseph Lister on Dr Peter Paterson's experiments on humans with tuberculosis vaccine, and on the simplification of his sterilisation procedure.

J. Marion Sims to Macewen

Details

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Title

J. Marion Sims to Macewen

Description

A letter from James Marion Sims to William Macewen requesting information on obtaining chromic acid gut ligatures.

Date

c. 1878

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/122/2

Description

A letter from James Marion Sims to William Macewen requesting information on obtaining chromic acid gut ligatures.

Rudyard Kipling Typescript Letter

Details

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Title

Rudyard Kipling Typescript Letter

Description

Letter from Rudyard Kipling to Ronald Ross regarding his Nobel Prize award.

Creator

Rudyard Kipling

Date

c. 1913

Identifier

RCPSG 9/NP/6/1/5

Description

Letter from Rudyard Kipling to Ronald Ross regarding his Nobel Prize award.

Manuscript Postcard from Sir William Osler

Details

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Title

Manuscript Postcard from Sir William Osler

Description

Postcard from William Osler to Ronald Ross informing him that he is attending his poetry recital.

Creator

Sir William Osler

Date

c. 1917

Identifier

RCPSG 9/LIT/28/3/17

Description

Postcard from William Osler to Ronald Ross informing him that he is attending his poetry recital.

Letter from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Description

Letter to Ronald Ross from Arthur Conan Doyle .

Creator

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Date

c. N.D.

Identifier

RCPSG 9/LIT/13/1/16

Description

Letter to Ronald Ross from Arthur Conan Doyle .

Letter from William Clark to Archibald Young

Details

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Title

Letter from William Clark to Archibald Young

Description

Letter from William Clark of Uddingston to Professor Archibald Young expressing thanks for his treatment at hospital.

“4 Clydeford Drive, Uddingston, 18/7/39.

Dear Professor Young,

When I read in this morning’s newspaper a remark you made at yesterday’s presentation of your portrait in oils- “One is more sure of today- one can be less sure of tomorrow.” I decided to write to you at once.

How can I find words for the adequate expression of my thanks for the great kindnesses you have shown me? We are told that out of the fullness of the heart the mouth speaketh. I have sometimes doubted the literal accuracy of that statement and never more than today. Blame the poverty of my vocabulary but whatever the cause it is certainly not any deficiency in my keen and abiding feeling of gratitude to you. I was sorry that I did not see you again before I left the hospital, but most unfortunately was asked to released duly as Mr Orr would explain.

I have been keeping fairly well, but my feet have been troubling me. Perhaps I was too soon at work and didn’t get an opportunity to rest them enough.

Let me say that while in hospital, I was most contented and received kindness from everyone.

My debt to the hospital I have not yet paid. I have been wondering if there is anything I could give to Ward 19 in your name. I noted that the Ward had no dinner-waggon.
I must give something. If that isn’t suitable, then money shall be sent in honour of one who has been to me a great friend.

I am hoping to visit the hospital on Saturday and then may find out what would be the most acceptable present for the Ward, Prof. Young’s Ward.

I sincerely pray that your health will greatly improve and that you will be spared to us for many years.

I trust that this note has made clear to you the warmth of my deepest gratitude.

Yours sincerely,

William Clark”


Date

c. 1939

Identifier

RCPSG 39/13/31

Description

Letter from William Clark of Uddingston to Professor Archibald Young expressing thanks for his treatment at hospital.

“4 Clydeford Drive, Uddingston, 18/7/39.

Dear Professor Young,

When I read in this morning’s newspaper a remark you made at yesterday’s presentation of your portrait in oils- “One is more sure of today- one can be less sure of tomorrow.” I decided to write to you at once.

How can I find words for the adequate expression of my thanks for the great kindnesses you have shown me? We are told that out of the fullness of the heart the mouth speaketh. I have sometimes doubted the literal accuracy of that statement and never more than today. Blame the poverty of my vocabulary but whatever the cause it is certainly not any deficiency in my keen and abiding feeling of gratitude to you. I was sorry that I did not see you again before I left the hospital, but most unfortunately was asked to released duly as Mr Orr would explain.

I have been keeping fairly well, but my feet have been troubling me. Perhaps I was too soon at work and didn’t get an opportunity to rest them enough.

Let me say that while in hospital, I was most contented and received kindness from everyone.

My debt to the hospital I have not yet paid. I have been wondering if there is anything I could give to Ward 19 in your name. I noted that the Ward had no dinner-waggon.
I must give something. If that isn’t suitable, then money shall be sent in honour of one who has been to me a great friend.

I am hoping to visit the hospital on Saturday and then may find out what would be the most acceptable present for the Ward, Prof. Young’s Ward.

I sincerely pray that your health will greatly improve and that you will be spared to us for many years.

I trust that this note has made clear to you the warmth of my deepest gratitude.

Yours sincerely,

William Clark”



Picture postcard of patient

Details

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Title

Picture postcard of patient

Description

Postcard of former patient of Mearnskirk

"Written in hand on the back 'with best wishes from Jessie, Coronation year, 1937'."

Date

c. 1937

Identifier

RCPSG 52/19/2/23

Description

Postcard of former patient of Mearnskirk

"Written in hand on the back 'with best wishes from Jessie, Coronation year, 1937'."

Letter from J. Stevenson to William Macewen

Details

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Title

Letter from J. Stevenson to William Macewen

Description

Letter from Stevenson to Macewen to arrange a check up on progress.

"9 Brisbane Street, Greenock, 7th December 1914.

Dear Sir,
I was a patient under you in Ward 15 for 6 weeks in the spring of this year, and underwent an operation for the removal of the little toe on my right foot, owing to long standing skin disease.
When able to go home, you on two occasions asked me to come back, and let you see me in about six months’ time. So if you let me know any day that would suit you either this week or next. I would be very pleased to come up.
I may say that the foot healed up beautifully, and I have been back at my work since the end of June, and have enjoyed many good long walks without any ill effects. And I feel I cannot express how grateful I am, for all the benefit I have got while under your care.

Yours sincerely,

James Stevenson

P.S. I left the hospital on the 2nd of May."

Creator

J. Stevenson

Date

c. 1914

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/127

Description

Letter from Stevenson to Macewen to arrange a check up on progress.

"9 Brisbane Street, Greenock, 7th December 1914.

Dear Sir,
I was a patient under you in Ward 15 for 6 weeks in the spring of this year, and underwent an operation for the removal of the little toe on my right foot, owing to long standing skin disease.
When able to go home, you on two occasions asked me to come back, and let you see me in about six months’ time. So if you let me know any day that would suit you either this week or next. I would be very pleased to come up.
I may say that the foot healed up beautifully, and I have been back at my work since the end of June, and have enjoyed many good long walks without any ill effects. And I feel I cannot express how grateful I am, for all the benefit I have got while under your care.

Yours sincerely,

James Stevenson

P.S. I left the hospital on the 2nd of May."

Letter from S.Mennie to William Macewen

Details

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Title

Letter from S.Mennie to William Macewen

Description

Letter of thanks from Mennie to Macewen for saving his life after a gunshot wound.

"County Police Station, Lauder. N.B., 26.2.89.

My Dear Sir,
I assure you it is no easy matter to express how truly grateful I am to you for saving my life, after having been so dangerously shot. I have every reason to be proud that I was placed under your able hand- under the care of a Surgeon whose skillful and most successful operations have gained for him a universal reputation. I am confident that I would not have been so promptly and successfully operated upon by any other Surgeon- which makes me all the more thankful. I am also glad to state that the the very careful way which I was nursed and the kind way which I was treated by your Nurses (in my opinion) contributed largely towards my speedy recovery. My friends and all who know me are highly pleased to see me discharged by you in such a satisfactory condition. I again thank you from my heart, and also your subordinates for their very kind attention. I trust you will accept of the enclosed small gift as a token of my appreciation of your most valuable services to me.

I am
My Dear Sir,
Yours Respectfully,

S. Mennie.

Creator

S. Mennie

Date

c. 1889

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/94

Description

Letter of thanks from Mennie to Macewen for saving his life after a gunshot wound.

"County Police Station, Lauder. N.B., 26.2.89.

My Dear Sir,
I assure you it is no easy matter to express how truly grateful I am to you for saving my life, after having been so dangerously shot. I have every reason to be proud that I was placed under your able hand- under the care of a Surgeon whose skillful and most successful operations have gained for him a universal reputation. I am confident that I would not have been so promptly and successfully operated upon by any other Surgeon- which makes me all the more thankful. I am also glad to state that the the very careful way which I was nursed and the kind way which I was treated by your Nurses (in my opinion) contributed largely towards my speedy recovery. My friends and all who know me are highly pleased to see me discharged by you in such a satisfactory condition. I again thank you from my heart, and also your subordinates for their very kind attention. I trust you will accept of the enclosed small gift as a token of my appreciation of your most valuable services to me.

I am
My Dear Sir,
Yours Respectfully,

S. Mennie.

Christmas Card

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Christmas Card

Description

Christmas card from Y.Masaki, a previous patient of William Macewen.

Date

c. 1913

Identifier

RCPSG 10/14/92/2

Description

Christmas card from Y.Masaki, a previous patient of William Macewen.

Letter from Y.Masaki to William Macewen

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from Y.Masaki to William Macewen

Description

This letter details thanks given from Masaki to Macewen for treatment received and a report on his progress.

"25, Hijikki Machi, Ushigome, Tokio.
5-12-13

Dear Sir Pro. Macewen,
I cannot ignore without sending an information about my condition, since I have got home. I am be able to walk a few miles without help of any stick and to move up my left arm with light thing now, moreover they are improving continuously still. Many friends of mine, who meet me when I have got home, were surprised about your cleverness and skillfulness, which let me be recovered so good.
I was expected, before I left England, that I must go in reserve list connection with my injured limbs, but I am remaining in an active service now that is your merit.
I venture to send a little cigar case to commemorate my limbs’ recovery by your treat, in the hope that you may perhaps like to make use of it.
Please give my kind regards to Lady Macquwen and Dr John.

Yours sincerely,

Y. Masaki"

Creator

Y. Masaki

Date

c. 1913

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/92/1

Description

This letter details thanks given from Masaki to Macewen for treatment received and a report on his progress.

"25, Hijikki Machi, Ushigome, Tokio.
5-12-13

Dear Sir Pro. Macewen,
I cannot ignore without sending an information about my condition, since I have got home. I am be able to walk a few miles without help of any stick and to move up my left arm with light thing now, moreover they are improving continuously still. Many friends of mine, who meet me when I have got home, were surprised about your cleverness and skillfulness, which let me be recovered so good.
I was expected, before I left England, that I must go in reserve list connection with my injured limbs, but I am remaining in an active service now that is your merit.
I venture to send a little cigar case to commemorate my limbs’ recovery by your treat, in the hope that you may perhaps like to make use of it.
Please give my kind regards to Lady Macquwen and Dr John.

Yours sincerely,

Y. Masaki"

Letter from William Macewen to J.W.Allan

Details

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Title

Letter from William Macewen to J.W.Allan

Description

This letter describes the feelings of friends on Allan's departure for China.

"13 Bath Street, March 5 1872.

James W. Allan.

My dear Friend,
I have received with much pleasure the news, both of the telegram and the letter; each in this season; announcing your safe arrival at the proximal extremity of your China journey. And I will weary till I have a telegram from Liverpool intimating your safe return.
I cannot describe to you, the feeling of that walk home on Sunday night. There seemed to be a wonderful lack of words, and a silent confusion pervaded all of us, as we tottered slowly down the streets, until, last of all, the silence began to be quite unbearable, and each tried to speak: but, the broken, semi-spasmodic sentences, which were uttered, only showed, too plainly, that our minds were on a very different subject from our tongues. Sutherland, remained quietly on the sofa, for a long time, and at last gave vent to a queer expression, emanating from the depths of the trachea, then a faint smile, lit for a moment his swarthy face, but only to make the dull eyes, still more dull and dismal, as if the lower part of his face was masking the upper: and shifting himself uneasily on the sofa he said “Hell man! Jamie is really away to China.” “It’s queer isn’t it.” And after a short interval, all of us, by one desire, wanted to separate. We wanted to be alone. So Archie and I drawing closer to each other than usual & holding each others arms firmer than our want, passed slowly down to the bridge, and for a little time looked sadly into the dark flowing river, which reflected the flickering lights and with promises to meet soon, grasped hands and departed; and the sorrow in Archie’s eye I still see: calm and deep.
There is a sort of dread hanging over me, which I hope will soon vanish. We may never meet again, here. You or I may leave this earth ere from ____, one sent into the past: but if it should be, we will know: whoever goes, that it will only be to participate the sooner in the mysteries of the eternal. One thing will never be shaken [:] our love for each other.

May God be with us.

William Macewen."

Creator

William Macewen

Date

c. 1872

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/5/1

Description

This letter describes the feelings of friends on Allan's departure for China.

"13 Bath Street, March 5 1872.

James W. Allan.

My dear Friend,
I have received with much pleasure the news, both of the telegram and the letter; each in this season; announcing your safe arrival at the proximal extremity of your China journey. And I will weary till I have a telegram from Liverpool intimating your safe return.
I cannot describe to you, the feeling of that walk home on Sunday night. There seemed to be a wonderful lack of words, and a silent confusion pervaded all of us, as we tottered slowly down the streets, until, last of all, the silence began to be quite unbearable, and each tried to speak: but, the broken, semi-spasmodic sentences, which were uttered, only showed, too plainly, that our minds were on a very different subject from our tongues. Sutherland, remained quietly on the sofa, for a long time, and at last gave vent to a queer expression, emanating from the depths of the trachea, then a faint smile, lit for a moment his swarthy face, but only to make the dull eyes, still more dull and dismal, as if the lower part of his face was masking the upper: and shifting himself uneasily on the sofa he said “Hell man! Jamie is really away to China.” “It’s queer isn’t it.” And after a short interval, all of us, by one desire, wanted to separate. We wanted to be alone. So Archie and I drawing closer to each other than usual & holding each others arms firmer than our want, passed slowly down to the bridge, and for a little time looked sadly into the dark flowing river, which reflected the flickering lights and with promises to meet soon, grasped hands and departed; and the sorrow in Archie’s eye I still see: calm and deep.
There is a sort of dread hanging over me, which I hope will soon vanish. We may never meet again, here. You or I may leave this earth ere from ____, one sent into the past: but if it should be, we will know: whoever goes, that it will only be to participate the sooner in the mysteries of the eternal. One thing will never be shaken [:] our love for each other.

May God be with us.

William Macewen."

J. W. MacIntyre to Comrie.

Details

Dublin Core

Title

J. W. MacIntyre to Comrie.

Description

Two copies of a letter and notes about x-ray work at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Creator

John Macintyre

Date

c. 1928

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/30/1-3

Description

Two copies of a letter and notes about x-ray work at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Letter regarding Royal Hospital for Sick Children Expansion

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter regarding Royal Hospital for Sick Children Expansion

Description

Letters to Dr James Finlayson regarding Finlayson's views on enlarging the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Date

c. 1906

Identifier

RCPSG 29/4/3-4

Description

Letters to Dr James Finlayson regarding Finlayson's views on enlarging the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Letter from Joseph Lister Regarding Honorary Fellowship

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from Joseph Lister Regarding Honorary Fellowship

Description

Letter from Joseph Lister acknowledging receipt of information on the date of his enrolment as an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Date

c. 1905

Identifier

RCPSG 11/1/8

Description

Letter from Joseph Lister acknowledging receipt of information on the date of his enrolment as an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Letter from A. Tisdall to William Macewen

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from A. Tisdall to William Macewen

Description

Details of a patient suicide in 1890, probably at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Creator

A. Tisdall

Date

c. 1897

Identifier

RCPSG 10/1A/132

Description

Details of a patient suicide in 1890, probably at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

Letter and Coin

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Letter and Coin

Description

A short memo about a patient who wished to exchange a Silver Jubilee Coin from 1977, to cover the cost of dental treatment that had been received.

Creator

Claudius Ash, Sons & Co. Ltd

Date

c. 1900s

Identifier

HD/1137

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Card, Silver

Description

A short memo about a patient who wished to exchange a Silver Jubilee Coin from 1977, to cover the cost of dental treatment that had been received.

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