Skip to main content
At the royal college of Physicians
and surgeons of Glasgow

Advanced Search

Back Details
Home > Museum and Artwork > Cardiac Bioptome with modern transfemoral instrument

Dublin Core

Title

Cardiac Bioptome with modern transfemoral instrument

Description

In the 1970's Professor Philip Caves, of the Cardiothoracic Transplant Laboratory at Stanford Medical School invented the cardiac bioptome. This instrument is used to diagnose heart rejection. The procedure is performed at regular intervals after transplant surgery, at occasional times when rejection is expected and to assess the adequacy of anti-rejection therapy. The bioptome is inserted through the patient's neck into the jugular vein. Under fluoroscopy it is guided to the apex of the right ventricle. The jaws of the instrument are opened and closed, and a small sample of tissue is consequently removed. Sometimes the bioptome is inserted through the femoral vein instead. The procedure lasts for about 30 minutes and is performed under general anaesthetic. Professor Caves' invention is regarded as the 'Gold Standard' for evaluating heart rejection.

Date

c. 1970s

Identifier

2006/1

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Cardiac Bioptome 86 mm (length) x 61 mm (width).
Transfemoral Instrument 157 mm (length) x 66 mm (width).

Materials

Metal, plastic.

Cardiac Bioptome with modern transfemoral instrument

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Cardiac Bioptome 86 mm (length) x 61 mm (width).
Transfemoral Instrument 157 mm (length) x 66 mm (width).

Materials

Metal, plastic.

Files

2006.1_bioptome 5.jpg
2006.1_bioptome 3.jpg

Collection

Citation

“Cardiac Bioptome with modern transfemoral instrument,” Heritage, accessed December 11, 2018, https://heritage.rcpsg.ac.uk/items/show/631.