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rmcsg minute book - lister lecture, 1868.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Joseph Lister 1868 Lecture on Antisepsis

Description

Pictured here is the minute book of the Glasgow Medico-Chirurgical Society. In this meeting, Joseph Lister presented his method of dressing wounds with carbolic acid, which was key to his work in antisepsis. This lecture took place in the Faculty Hall, now the College's Princess Alexandera room.

"An extra meeting of the Society was held this evening, and the President occupied the chair.

The minutes of last meeting were read and approved.
Mr Lister gave a lengthened exposition of the atmospheric germ theory of putrefaction, and illustrated it by the exhibition of M. Pasteur’s experiment with flasks containing urine.

He next directed attention to the employment of Carbolic acid for the destruction of the germs presumed to exist in the air, and which Mr Lister supposed to be the exciting cause of putrefaction in wounds; and for the details of a case in which a young man sustained an incised wound of left side of thorax, with penetration through the diaphragm and protrusion of omentum through the wound externally.

The protruding portion of omentum was cut off; and although the left pleural cavity was so distended with air and haemorrhage as to cause displacement of the heart to the right side of the chest, the young man made a perfect recovery under the Carbolic acid dressings.
Mr L then described the effects of a ligature applied on the antiseptic system to the carotid of a horse, and showed the portion of the artery, and the superjacent skin, as well as the ligature, all of which had been removed from the horse, which had died from some disease unconnected with the operation, 13 days after.
He also narrated a case of ligature of the external iliac artery by the same method, and the history of a case of necrosis of the tibia, in which some of the dead bone had come away, but was presumed to have been absorbed.

The mode of dressing wounds with Carbolic acid was next described; the part of Carbolic acid in 20 of water being recommended for an internal application; and for external dressing, after experimenting with a number of different substances, Mr Lister had arrived at the conclusion that emplastrum plumbi with a fourth of its weight of bees wax and impregnated with Carbolic acid is the most suitable. The strength of the dressing ought however in all cases to be regulated by the nature of the wound.

A discussion following, was, chiefly owing to the late hour, confined principally to the cause of putrefaction in wounds, and the theory which had been advanced by Mr Lister to account for the antiseptic properties of the Carbolic acid."

Date

c. 1868

Description

Pictured here is the minute book of the Glasgow Medico-Chirurgical Society. In this meeting, Joseph Lister presented his method of dressing wounds with carbolic acid, which was key to his work in antisepsis. This lecture took place in the Faculty Hall, now the College's Princess Alexandera room.

james g.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

The Case of James Greenlees

Description

In 1867, Joseph Lister published a series of articles in The Lancet that were to be the first examples of antisepsis in action. Each of the cases occurred during his time working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. His first case was a young boy by the name of James Greenlees, who had an open fracture of his leg. Lister set the fracture and dressed the wound in carbolic acid to prevent infection. James made a full recovery. This was the birth of antisepsis.

Description


23_4_17-18_lister bottle_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Glass bottles used by Joseph Lister

Description

Two photographs of glass bottles used by Joseph Lister when replicating the experiment of Louis Pasteur.

Date

c. Unknown

Identifier

RCPSG 23/4/17-18

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

A3 print

Physical Dimensions

29.7 cm x 42cm

Description

Two photographs of glass bottles used by Joseph Lister when replicating the experiment of Louis Pasteur.

23_4_17-18_lister bottle_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Glass bottles used by Joseph Lister

Description

Photograph of glass bottles used by Joseph Lister when replicating the experiment of Louis Pasteur.

Date

c. Unknown

Identifier

RCPSG 23/4/17-18

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

A3 print

Physical Dimensions

42cm x 29.7 cm

Description

Photograph of glass bottles used by Joseph Lister when replicating the experiment of Louis Pasteur.

germs.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Fight the Germs Game

Description

This game is a spin of an old classic. Inspired by the discovery of antisepsis by Joseph Lister in Glasgow, this game was created for the 150th anniversary event, Listermania.

Listermania (2018) was a celebration of Joseph Lister's pioneering work on antisepsis in Glasgow.

Description

This game is a spin of an old classic. Inspired by the discovery of antisepsis by Joseph Lister in Glasgow, this game was created for the 150th anniversary event, Listermania.

Listermania (2018) was a celebration of Joseph Lister's pioneering work on antisepsis in Glasgow.

lister_spray_new.png

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Animation on Lister's Carbolic Spray

Description

In 1897, Joseph Lister published his ground-breaking article “Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery” in the medical journal, The Lancet. This article presented Lister's initial cases where he used what would become his principle of antisepsis. It was in the Glasgow Royal Infirmary that Lister first started using carbolic as an antiseptic, heralding the beginnings of a surgical revolution.

The carbolic spray, however, was mainly employed during Lister's time as a surgeon in Edinburgh. As well as sterilising wounds, Lister aimed to sterilise the surgical environment. Hence, an operator would pump carbolic spray around the operating theatre to eradicate any germs. Unfortunately, this had detrimental effects on practitioners since they were inhaling highly concentrated carbolic acid.

Description

In 1897, Joseph Lister published his ground-breaking article “Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery” in the medical journal, The Lancet. This article presented Lister's initial cases where he used what would become his principle of antisepsis. It was in the Glasgow Royal Infirmary that Lister first started using carbolic as an antiseptic, heralding the beginnings of a surgical revolution.

The carbolic spray, however, was mainly employed during Lister's time as a surgeon in Edinburgh. As well as sterilising wounds, Lister aimed to sterilise the surgical environment. Hence, an operator would pump carbolic spray around the operating theatre to eradicate any germs. Unfortunately, this had detrimental effects on practitioners since they were inhaling highly concentrated carbolic acid.

2018-9.11_antiseptic cream_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Antiseptic Cream

Description

Squeeze bottle of Dettol antiseptic cream, with cardboard box & leaflet.

Date

c. 1900s

Identifier

2018/9.11

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

4.5 x 4.7 x 14.7 cm

Materials

Cardboard, plastic.

Description

Squeeze bottle of Dettol antiseptic cream, with cardboard box & leaflet.

2018-9.12_dettol bottle_2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Dettol Bottle

Description

Dettol bottle (half full) with label of George NK Murray

Creator

George N. K. Murray; Chemist

Date

c. 20th century

Identifier

2018/9.12

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

H; 21 cm

Materials

Glass, cork.

Description

Dettol bottle (half full) with label of George NK Murray

2018.17.1_nylon ligature_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Nylon Ligature

Description

Glass ampoule containing Armour's sterilized surgical ligature and curved needle

Date

c. 1900s

Identifier

2018/17.1

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

9 x 6 x 1 cm

Materials

Glass

Description

Glass ampoule containing Armour's sterilized surgical ligature and curved needle

1997.7.2_steriliser_1.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portable Steriliser

Description

Portable steriliser, metal, that belonged to Alexander Strang.

Date

c. 1930s

Identifier

1997/7.2

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Length: 31 cm

Materials

Metal

Description

Portable steriliser, metal, that belonged to Alexander Strang.

2007.1.18_Milne Murray midwifery forceps 7.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Portable Steriliser

Description

Metal portable steriliser for sterilising instruments.

Date

c. 1920s-1940s

Identifier

2007/1.20

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

11 x 41 x 9.5 cm

Materials

Metal

Description

Metal portable steriliser for sterilising instruments.

catgut ligature 11.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Neoprotosil Antiseptic

Description

Glass bottle with cork stopper containing capsules of Neo-Protosil (Collidal Silver Iodide Compound). Used as an antiseptic cermicide.

Date

c. Unknown

Identifier

HD/1115

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Glass, Cork

Description

Glass bottle with cork stopper containing capsules of Neo-Protosil (Collidal Silver Iodide Compound). Used as an antiseptic cermicide.

catgut ligature 8.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Neoprotosil Antiseptic

Description

Glass bottle with cork stopper containing a half ounce of Neo-Protosil (Collidal Silver Iodide Compound). Used as an antiseptic cermicide.

Date

c. Unknown

Identifier

HD/1114

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Materials

Glass. cork.

Description

Glass bottle with cork stopper containing a half ounce of Neo-Protosil (Collidal Silver Iodide Compound). Used as an antiseptic cermicide.

2003.2.28_glass container with violet 2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Stoppered Glass Bottle of Gentian Violet

Description

Stoppered glass bottle, 20th century.

Gentian Violet is a chemical stain most commonly used in histology. In medicine, this chemical can be used as an antiseptic for fungal conditions, such as Athlete's Foot. It can also be put on open wounds to prevent any infection.

Creator

Unknown

Date

c. 1900s

Identifier

2003/2.28

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Height: 8.2 cm

Materials

Glass

Description

Stoppered glass bottle, 20th century.

Gentian Violet is a chemical stain most commonly used in histology. In medicine, this chemical can be used as an antiseptic for fungal conditions, such as Athlete's Foot. It can also be put on open wounds to prevent any infection.

2003.174_lister carbolic spray 2.jpg

Details

Dublin Core

Title

Lister Carbolic Spray

Description

Lister (1826-1912) used a steam spray such as this one to spray the air in his operating theatre with carbolic acid. Sprays containing measures of carbolic acid were used in Lister's wards between the 1870s and the 1890s.

The maker of this spray was David Marr of 27 Little Queen Street, London, who made many of Lister's instruments. The spray has a grey metal body with a wooden handle attached at one side and a container for the carbolic acid at the other side. Water was boiled in the upper container of the main part of the spray by a spirit lamp in the lower part. The steam produced was emitted across the tube leading into the container of carbolic acid whereupon the steam mixed with the acid.

Implements used by Lister for spraying underwent a steady evolution. Originally an ordinary rubber bulb spray was used, this was then replaced by a large and more cumbersome machine which was mounted on a tripod and manipulated by a long pump handle. Stage three in the development process was the steam spray shown here.

The carbolic acid solution used in the sprays also developed with time, the parts of acid becoming stronger. Lister was aware that the air was a medium for germs and his belief that germs could be destroyed by chemical substances was influenced by the work of Louis Pasteur.

The use of the spraying technique employed by Lister was an important element of the antiseptic ritual of treatment. Lister's success with antiseptic procedures revolutionised the treatment of disease and injuries.

Related Items

The papers of Joseph Lister (RCPSG 11) are held in the College Archives.

The College also holds a pocket case of lancets, bistouries, probes and hooks which belonged to Joseph Lister.

In the Lister room within the College there is a table and a fireplace rescued from the Lister wards of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary when they were demolished in 1924. Lord Lister's graduation gown is also displayed in this room.

The College's art collection includes an etching of Joseph Lister by Wilfred C. Applebey and a print of a portrait of him by T. Hamilton Crawford, as well as a picture of the scene of the demolition of the Lister wards.

Date

c. 1870-1890

Identifier

2003/174

Physical Object Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

Height: 24.8 cm

Materials

Glass; metal; rubber; wood

Description

Lister (1826-1912) used a steam spray such as this one to spray the air in his operating theatre with carbolic acid. Sprays containing measures of carbolic acid were used in Lister's wards between the 1870s and the 1890s.

The maker of this spray was David Marr of 27 Little Queen Street, London, who made many of Lister's instruments. The spray has a grey metal body with a wooden handle attached at one side and a container for the carbolic acid at the other side. Water was boiled in the upper container of the main part of the spray by a spirit lamp in the lower part. The steam produced was emitted across the tube leading into the container of carbolic acid whereupon the steam mixed with the acid.

Implements used by Lister for spraying underwent a steady evolution. Originally an ordinary rubber bulb spray was used, this was then replaced by a large and more cumbersome machine which was mounted on a tripod and manipulated by a long pump handle. Stage three in the development process was the steam spray shown here.

The carbolic acid solution used in the sprays also developed with time, the parts of acid becoming stronger. Lister was aware that the air was a medium for germs and his belief that germs could be destroyed by chemical substances was influenced by the work of Louis Pasteur.

The use of the spraying technique employed by Lister was an important element of the antiseptic ritual of treatment. Lister's success with antiseptic procedures revolutionised the treatment of disease and injuries.

Related Items

The papers of Joseph Lister (RCPSG 11) are held in the College Archives.

The College also holds a pocket case of lancets, bistouries, probes and hooks which belonged to Joseph Lister.

In the Lister room within the College there is a table and a fireplace rescued from the Lister wards of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary when they were demolished in 1924. Lord Lister's graduation gown is also displayed in this room.

The College's art collection includes an etching of Joseph Lister by Wilfred C. Applebey and a print of a portrait of him by T. Hamilton Crawford, as well as a picture of the scene of the demolition of the Lister wards.

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